fj40 Mostly original, limited damage, limited rust - Great restoration candidate

Price: US $2,900.00 Item location: Durango, Colorado, United States
  • Make: Toyota
  • Model: Land Cruiser
  • Type: Hardtop
  • Trim: FJ40
  • Year: 1968
  • Mileage: 0
  • VIN: FJ4055819
  • Color: Green
  • Engine size: 3.9L 3878CC l6 GAS Naturally Aspirated
  • Number of cylinders: 6
  • Fuel: Gasoline
  • Transmission: Manual
  • Drive type: 4WD
  • Interior color: White
  • Options: Convertible
  • Vehicle Title: Clear
  • Want to buy? Contact seller!
Description:

1968 Toyota Land Cruiser

FJ4055819 1968 Toyota FJ40 Land Cruiser for restoration



Summary:


I bought this 1968 Toyota FJ40 in Idaho in early 2005. It has not been off my residential property in Colorado since only a few months later (in 2005). It is cosmetically rough, but it’s mostly undamaged, it’s mostly rust-free, and it’s mostly original. The vehicle is not roadworthy, but the engine starts up and the vehicle moves under it’s own power like it did back in 2005 during the brief period I drove it on public roads. This FJ40 appears to be a great candidate for a full restoration! Or just do the repairs needed to get it to safe and roadworthy condition and use the trendy “patina” term to describe the appearance when using it as a daily driver. The photos should pretty clearly show the general cosmetic condition. Other vehicle issues are discussed generally in the next few paragraphs and in far more detail in the Inspection Planning Guide below (“guide”) — The guide starts right after the “Purchase Information” section. It is a very long document, and will definitely take some time to read all of it, but hopefully you will find it to have been valuable once read. Thanks for your interest in this FJ40!



Vehicle repairs required


There are structural defects in the driver floorpan of the vehicle, defects in the vehicle spare tire carrier arm latch, defects in vehicle safety systems such as braking and lighting, and there are other defects and problems that affect the cosmetic appearance and safe and reliable use of the vehicle. The vehicle may have had several original parts removed, or removed and replaced with aftermarket items. Bidders are advised to consider the cost of repairing the defects and the costs of replacing components that may have been removed, including but not limited to, seat belts, fuse holder, tools and tire jack, rear jump seats, rear heater, and possibly some emissions equipment. Furthermore, bidders are advised that a prior owner of the vehicle appears to have removed and bypassed the externally-mounted engine oil filter housing, and bidders should carefully consider the cost of replacing the oil filter and the cost of repairing any damage that may have been caused to the engine as the result of not having oil filtration for some period of time. The inspection guide below provides a significant amount of information that may be helpful for planning an inspection of the vehicle prior to bidding.


By placing a bid, bidders acknowledge that the car is presently not roadworthy, acknowledge that repairs by a qualified individual will be required after a complete inspection of the vehicle by a qualified individual, and acknowledge that seller shall not be held responsible for any injury or damage resulting from possession or any use of the vehicle by purchaser or any assigns.



Vehicle transport required


As the vehicle is not presently roadworthy, it cannot be used on the highways of Colorado until repairs are completed by the purchaser. Therefore, the purchaser will need to arrange for vehicle shipping, or for vehicle transport on a vehicle trailer or suitable vehicle, from the current vehicle location on private property in Durango, Colorado, to the location purchaser will repair or store the vehicle.


By placing a bid, bidders acknowledge that purchaser is responsible for all vehicle shipping and transportation arrangements and costs.



Vehicle Emissions


This vehicle is located, and was last registered, in a county of Colorado that does not require vehicle emissions inspections. The vehicle does NOT have a Colorado certification of emissions control. As stated above the vehicle requires structural and other repairs to return it to roadworthy condition.


Colorado State law requires sellers to provide purchasers who live within Colorado emission plan areas, with a Colorado certification of emissions control, unless the vehicle is not roadworthy and has the following declaration:


I) The vehicle does not currently comply with the emissions requirements for the program area;

II) The seller does not warrant that the vehicle will comply with the emissions requirements; and

III) The purchaser is responsible for complying with the emissions requirements prior to registering this vehicle in the program area.


All bidders should contact their State Department of Motor Vehicles, before bidding, to understand the emissions and other registration requirements that the purchaser will be responsible for, upon purchase of the vehicle. By placing a bid, all bidders acknowledge that seller shall not be held responsible for complying with any emission requirements, and that purchaser is responsible for all costs of complying with emissions requirements.



No Warranty


BY PLACING A BID, BIDDERS ACKNOWLEDGE THAT THE VEHICLE IS BEING SOLD AS-IS, WHERE-IS, WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AND THE SELLER ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY REPAIRS REGARDLESS OF ANY WRITTEN OR ORAL STATEMENTS ABOUT THE VEHICLE.



Purchase information


Potential bidders are encouraged to personally inspect the vehicle, or have the vehicle professionally inspected, at the vehicle’s current location in Durango, Colorado, prior to bidding. The seller can start the vehicle for inspection, but as the vehicle is not roadworthy it cannot be driven off the private residential property where it is located. Bidders can contact the seller via eBay with any questions or to arrange an inspection of the vehicle before the auction close.


Seller is responsible for any and all taxes.


The full payment is required by bank-to-bank wire transfer to seller’s bank within 3 days of Auction close. Neither the vehicle nor the title will be released to the purchaser, until payment has been accepted and cleared to my account by my bank. Please have your funding arranged before bidding. If the wired funds are not transferred by the end of the third business day after the close of the auction, the item will be re-listed.


The Seller fully intends to sell the vehicle if the auction reserve and purchase terms are met, however, as unforeseen circumstances may occur, Seller reserves the right to cancel the auction at any time.





Inspection Planning Guide (“guide”)


The information that follows discloses and details many known vehicle defects and problems, however it was primarily developed to help potential bidders in planning a personal and/or professional inspection of the vehicle. Please note that while the intent was to accurately convey information known about the vehicle, I am neither a professional mechanic nor an FJ40 expert and therefore the information that follows in this guide may contain errors and omissions. All potential bidders should read the entire document before bidding, however, under no circumstances should the guide be used as a substitute for a detailed vehicle inspection by bidders, purchaser, or any qualified assign of the bidder or purchaser.


-Note that the parts that I indicate as being “available” from FJ40 parts suppliers throughout the following guide, were available as of mid-to-late August of 2016, when the guide was prepared. The availability and pricing was obtained through the public websites of several FJ40 specialty parts suppliers and where noted, from eBay. The prices are in US dollars and do not include tax and shipping, but also do not include any discounts that may be available to repeat customers. None of the part prices include any estimate of installation labor. Just to make sure it is clearly stated, none of the parts described as being “available” are included with the purchase of the vehicle.



Vehicle History


-Bought in February of 2005 on eBay. I have a copy of the eBay listing and will provide it to the purchaser along with all other documentation I have.

-My intent was to drive the vehicle to allow another family member to use my other car, and then start a full restoration of the vehicle.


-The seller of the vehicle was a dealer near Boise, Idaho, and said the vehicle had been on a Oregon and/or Idaho farm (I do not recall which State, or if it was both states) for many years and used primarily as a farm runabout. Odometer reading in the eBay listing was 49,857 miles and was described as “original miles according to the owner”. The odometer matched, or was within a few miles, of the stated mileage when I traveled to Idaho to get the vehicle. The dealer description indicated the vehicle had a number of light bulbs that were burned out. Brakes were described as “soft and squeaky”. The brake pedal response was firm and the system appeared functional when I tested them at the dealer location.


-The vehicle was trailered from Boise Idaho to Grand Junction, Colorado (by a person with the dealership who was en-route to Denver to pick up a car). I then drove the vehicle in daylight on paved roads, from Grand Junction to Durango, Colorado, on a route of at most, 246 miles. The route includes steep grades up and down mountain passes, several of which are over 9,000 feet in elevation. I drove the vehicle up to a maximum speed of about 50 miles an hour on the trip and there appeared to be no unusual mechanical noises throughout the trip.


-During the trip, the odometer stopped working as it was rolling over from 49,999 to 50,000 miles.

-At the completion of the trip, I parked the vehicle at my home. The vehicle became inaccessible after being plowed-in from several late-winter snow storms.


-I dug out the snowbanks and freed the vehicle sometime in April of 2005. In early May of 2005 I began efforts to get the vehicle registered, which required a physical check of the VIN. At the same time my workload unexpectedly increased, delaying my efforts. Late in May I drove the vehicle to the local DMV, a round trip of approximately 25 miles on a temporary registration sticker, got the VIN inspection, got the vehicle registered and subsequently received the Colorado Title. I had declared the odometer problem to the DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) and the 5/27/2005 title shows 0 miles under ODOMETER.


-I recall driving the car into my workplace in early June, also a round trip of about 25 miles, a few times in order to check, and if needed replace light bulbs at local auto-parts stores. In the process I found there were problems with the some of the running, brake and turn lights that were beyond simple bulb replacement. Due primarily to the lighting issues (and lack of time to be able to diagnose and resolve them), I stopped driving the car.


-Unfortunately my workload continued to significantly increase and prevented any effort on the vehicle. Passing days became months and years, with no more activity on the car beyond starting it up every few months to keep everything moving and the battery charged.


-At some time, the battery expired.I subsequently replaced it to be able to continue being able to start and exercise the engine.


-At some other time, I noticed the brake master cylinder was low on fluid. I looked for brake fluid leaks on the pavement, saw none and topped off the cylinder. Several months later, the level had dropped again, with no fluid on the pavement. Rather than top it off again without knowing where the fluid was going, I left it as it was. Over time the pedal became soft.


-I kept the car registered until 2008 and then, as the result of an omission, allowed the registration to lapse.


-The routine of occasionally starting it up, continued for years while I still hoped for a future situation that would allow me time to do a restoration.


-About 2 years ago, during a routine start-up of the vehicle, I realized it would still be many more years before I would have time to do a full restoration. I subsequently promised my wife I would sell the vehicle, only to find my workload hindered even the effort required to find it a new home.

-It took some significant changes, but about a month ago, I finally freed up the time to locate and consolidate vehicle paperwork, to start documenting the vehicle condition, and to start determining how to list it for sale on eBay.


-In the process of documenting the vehicle condition for this listing, while looking for rust, I noticed that there appeared to be some brake fluid on the inside of the firewall and on the carpet just below the master cylinder. This most likely explains why there had been no brake fluid leaks observed on the pavement. I subsequently removed the carpet and confirmed there is a small leak from the master cylinder. As noted earlier, the prior owner described a soft pedal and it would appear to be likely that the cause was this defect in the master brake cylinder.


-As of the time of this listing, I have not driven the vehicle off of my residential property since 2005 and in total, I estimate I have only driven a maximum of 396 miles since the vehicle was purchased.


- When I purchased the vehicle it appeared to be a great candidate for a complete restoration. Even after recently finding a few surprising issues with the vehicle, it still appears to be a great candidate, especially given the current market for restored versions of these classic vehicles. While I would still like to do a FJ40 restoration, I am finally making good on my years-old promise to my wife to sell the vehicle and move on to finishing other long-neglected projects.



Identification


-Chassis number FJ40 55819 is stamped on the front passenger side frame rail and matches the VIN plate on engine bay wheel well, as well as current Colorado Title. When going through the car to develop this guide, I found an old9/25/86Oregon registration card slipped inside a partial repair manual in the glovebox. The physical address on the registration card was Salem, Oregon. The registration card VIN and year match current title and vehicle data. I recently checked the VIN against the VIN data on two FJ40 specialist parts supplier websites, and both show a vehicle production date of between March and April of 1968, consistent with the title and other 1968 data points in the records. Finally, I recently learned of an insurance-industry sponsored organization NICB, that offers a free VIN checking service, VINChecksm. I ran the check which reported no issues with the vehicle VIN.


-I have not found any other VIN plates besides the one on the engine bay passenger inside wheel well. The VIN Plate identifies the Toyota as a FJ40 L model (L indicating the left hand, USA, driving position).


-Block number F256249 is stamped on the vehicle block - the Specter Off Road website and a second FJ40 specialty parts supplier website, both have 1969 engine block production data points (2) on their websites (8/1969-F290459 12/1969-F300193), but neither has any data for 1968 engines. I could find no other data on the internet regarding 1968 block numbers. Note that the engine block number (F256249) does appear to be plausible for a vehicle produced 16 to 17 months earlier in 1968, however, I do not know enough FJ40 history to determine if this engine block was original to the vehicle.


-Cylinder head number appears to be 60030. I have contacted an FJ40 parts supplier to attempt to date the cylinder head, but unfortunately, so far the supplier has not been able to find data for the head (but is still looking) Through discussion with the supplier, the supplier indicated it is a “F” head (no front bolt location on foremost manifold port).


-The partial repair manual I found in the glovebox appears to be a Toyota publication. The partial manual and old registration card will be provided to the purchaser, along with all other documentation from my purchase of the vehicle.



Body


Paint

-At some time before I purchased the car, the outside body of the car was over-coated with a forest green color. The green paint appears to have been applied over a prior off-white paint layer which is over what appears to be a reddish-brown primer layer. The interior sheetmetal surfaces were left in the white color. There are areas of green overspray on the white areas in the engine compartment, inside door pillars, and elsewhere. There are many issues with the green paint, including scratches, crazing and overall oxidation.


-In several locations, the green, white and primer paint are totally gone. Fortunately the underlying bare metal appears to have only light surface rust. The two most obvious areas are on the hood and windshield surround.


-In many places on the inside, the white paint has peeled or been scratched off from wear, exposing what appears to be the base red primer. Look closely at the interior photos as several spots that appear to be rust are actually primer. There are many other interior paint issues including scratches with surface rust and surface rust stains. In some locations, such as the dash and driver door, the white paint appeared to have been touched up by a previous owner with spray paint of a slightly different white color. The appearance of this work is poor.


-Roof and front grill surround appeared to have been re-painted in a white glossy paint just prior to my purchase of the vehicle. I noticed some crazing of this paint on the roof at the time of purchase. There has been some oxidation of this paint during the time I have owned the vehicle.


-Wheel rims appeared to have been repainted with a glossy gray paint just prior to my purchase and also now show some oxidation and other issues.


Tub and related sheetmetal

-Firewall, front outside vent panels, cowl, dashboard, rocker panels, floor tunnel, rear area floor, rear wheel wells, all all miscellaneous connecting panels appear free from damage.


-Side cabin fresh air vents are functional and appear to open and close easily.


-The steering column gasket/grommet has large gaps between the rubber and the column. Most other firewall and dash area grommets and gaskets are in similar condition.


-Driver’s side lower rear quarter panel appears free of significant rust issues. The panel does have some limited accident damage suffered during prior ownership. The damage appears confined to a 6” diameter area above the “TOYOTA” and “4 WHEEL DRIVE” badges. There is a tire/gas can swing arm attachment bracket at this location and the flat rear area of the quarter panel has been pushed in about 1/2” at the bracket location. Damage repair would appear to be relatively straightforward, limited to a short weld of less than 2” to repair a panel tear, and then panel beating and finishing to remove the depression. The reverse light is in the damaged sheetmetal area, however it appears undamaged and the clear lens is in fairly good condition. The surround and rubber gasket are oxidized. The “TOYOTA” and “4 WHEEL DRIVE” badges appear free of damage. The badge surface condition is fair to good. The rubber gaskets are painted and cracked. The rear side reflector lens is in good condition, however the surround has oxidized paint and some light surface rust. My pre-purchase research indicated the curved parts of FJ40 rear lower quarter panels often have rust-through issues. The driver side lower quarter panel on this vehicle appears free of any corrosion issues besides possibly some surface rust.


-Passenger side rear quarter panel appears free from any significant damage. A prior owner appears to have ground away a small area of the pillar seam near the door latching mechanism. It appears this was to give the door panel latch assembly area some extra clearance. The hinges on the passenger door appear to have been slightly “tweaked” to stop the door from drooping and in the process it appears the door shifted slightly backwards, likely requiring the extra clearance. The ground-away steel appears straightforward to restore with only a couple of inches of weld bead application, followed by shaping and finishing. In looking for rust on the vehicle, I did find a small area of very thin body filler in the bottom front corner of this quarter panel. The filler was applied over bare metal and is below the primer and paint. The steel underneath the filler appeared rust-free and un-damaged at the time I peeled away the small area of paint/primer and filler. I do not know enough of the FJ40 history to know if Toyota used filler on bare body shells. As with the driver’s side, the curved part of the panels appears to be free of any significant rust. The rear side reflector appears original and the lens is in good condition except for two small scratches. The surround has oxidized paint and some light surface rust.


-There is a small area of thin body filler near the driver side hood hinge on the outside top cowling just in front of the windshield. While recently looking for rust for this guide, I noticed there was paint cracking and lifting in the area. Due to the depth of the cracks, I peeled away a small section of the paint to reveal the base metal, which was white metal and free of rust at the time. The filler came up with the paint and appears to be beneath the primer and white/green top paint layers. There appears to be no indication of panel damage or rust on the underside. A slight warping and dimpling of the bare metal is apparent and the filler appears to haver been applied to deal with this cosmetic issue. Again, I do not know enough of the FJ40 history to know if Toyota used filler on bare body shells, but the filler appears to match the material found on the front of the quarter panel as described above.


-Rear passenger/cargo area floor appears to be free of damage. There are numerous scratches and paint wear on the floor but corrosion appears limited only to surface rust in areas where the paint and primer are not present. The underside of the rear tub floor looks far better than the interior as the surface appears more uniform and appears also free of any significant issues.


-There was, and still is, some 1970’s-looking carpet glued on top of the wheel wells. I had previously checked the wheel well panels from the underside and saw no issues besides dirt and possibly some limited surface rust. I recently pulled the carpet back enough to check the metal from within the vehicle. In the areas I looked at, the panels only appear to have some surface rust.


-Passenger floor area has surface rust and some areas of light pitting. I recently took a screwdriver and poked at several spots on the floor and it appeared to be solid. Over time, window weatherstripping problems appear to have allowed the floor mats to get wet, creating the environment for the surface rust on the top of the panel. The underside of the panel appears to have just road dirt and no significant rust.


-While vehicle disassembly or media blasting could always reveal some hidden issues, the driver’s side floor pan appears to be the only area of significant rust on the entire body. There is a frame outrigger extension that supports the driver running board, below and just in front of the rusted area on the floor. The extension is called a “running board stay”. At some time prior to my purchase of the vehicle, it appears the vehicle drove over and hit something like a large rock, which bent the running board stay. The floor may have been damaged at the same time, starting the rusting process. Alternatively, the rust may have started as a result of an often-wet carpet resulting from gaps in firewall penetrations and/or from problems with window and windshield weatherstripping. I recently used a chisel and then a drill to attempt to identify the current extent of significant rust. The affected area appears to be about 6” x 12”. The 12” width is across the floorboard and starts near the outside rocker panel seam. The rocker panel and seam does not appear to be significantly affected. The rust area continues towards the floor tunnel section, but again, the seam/joint area does not appear to be affected. There is some surface rust on the lower edge of the tunnel panel but it also appears to be solid. The rusted area moves back towards the seat/toolbox area but appears to stop before the toolbox joint. Moving forward, the significant rust appears to stop well before the firewall seam. There are two photos of this area in the listing (one photo from above after I opened up the rust, one photo from below before poking around and through with the chisel). Note that replacement driver’s area partial floor pans are available from FJ40 parts suppliers from about $155. The driver floorpan is defective and requires repair or replacement by a qualified individual, and the entire vehicle should be inspected for structural safety problems and should be repaired as needed by a qualified individual, in order to return the vehicle structure to roadworthy condition.



Other sheetmetal/body

-Front grill, headlight trim panel and surrounding front bib panel appear to be free of damage or any significant rust. “TOYOTA” badge surface is oxidized. Orange running lights lenses are heavily oxidized. The passenger side lens has small hole and both rubber gaskets and surrounds are cracked and oxidized.


-Front fenders both appear to free of damage or any significant rust. Turn light rubber gaskets are cracked and coated with paint. Passenger side turn light lens is orange and heavily oxidized. Right turn light lens is clear and in good condition. Light enclosures have surface rust inside and electrical contacts have light oxidation.


-Engine compartment hood apron panels and inner wheel well panels appear to be free of damage or any significant rust. Both side “TOYOTA Land Cruiser” badges are present and the chrome is in fairly good condition. Both reflector lenses and rubber gaskets are in good condition, however the silver metal surrounds have oxidized paint and have some light surface rust on the top sides. Both hood restraint attachment brackets are present without issues.


-Hood appears to be free of damage or any significant corrosion. There are some fairly large areas of light surface rust as noted in the paint information above. Note this rust is smooth with almost no pitting. Hinges function without binding. Center chrome trim piece has some chrome scratches but is otherwise in fairly good condition. Rubber windshield bumpers appear to be original and while functional, are cracked at front and rear lower edges. Both hood hold-downs function although passenger side is missing the small rubber bumper insert. Note the rubber part is available from FJ40 parts suppliers for less than $5. Both windshield hold-downs are present and appear to be functional. All screws that do not have green or other paint on them, have light surface oxidation. Some hood rubber gasket/sealing material is present on the top of the bib panel but some rubber pieces are missing.


-Windshield surround appears to be free of damage or any significant corrosion. There are some fairly large areas of light surface rust as noted in the paint section above. This surface rust is mostly smooth with almost no pitting. It appears that the hinges would function but I have not ever attempted to lower the windshield to test them. Hinges and screws were sprayed with the green paint.


-Door panels appear to be free of damage. All hinges are functional but several appear to have worn hinge pins. Note that new hinge pins are available from FJ40 parts suppliers in original and upgraded materials. Hinges and screws were sprayed with green paint. Driver’s side door is drooping about 1/8” to 1/4” at the bottom right corner but closes with little to no more force than the passenger door which does not droop. As noted above, the passenger door hinges appear to have been slightly bent to allow the door to hang without drooping. Door latches and locks all work, inside and out.


-Upper rear quarter panels that surround the rear side and rear corner windows both appear to be free from damage or significant rust. The interior panel attachment screws have some rust present.


-Rear upper hatch appears to be free of damage or significant rust. The hatch appears to sit slightly towards the passenger side which interferes with easy latch operation. Inside handle works the latches and with little effort, the hatch can be opened from the inside. Outside handle does not pull in either latch. Note that replacement door handles are available from FJ40 parts suppliers as are most latch parts. Rear hatch lock works. Hatch door lift rods both work and hold the hatch up effectively. Door lift rod appearance is poor with some chrome scratches and some surface rust.


-Rear lower swinging door on driver side appears undamaged. The hinges are somewhat stiff and begin to bind when the door is almost closed, apparently from the previously described driver side quarter panel depression damage, which edges on the hinges. It appears that straightening out the panel depression would help or possibly solve this door hinge issue. The OEM license plate bracket, that mounts on a bracket that is on the door, was not present in this location when I purchased the vehicle. Note that used license plate brackets are available from FJ40 parts suppliers for under $100.


-Rear lower swinging door on passenger side appears original and free from damage. Hinges appear fine and latch mechanisms are functional.


-Driver side running board appears to be original and free from damage or rust. The white tread material appears to have almost completely disintegrated from the sun.


-The passenger side running board has a wavy outer vertical flange (from several small dents) that appears straightforward to straighten out. The tread material is in the same disintegrated condition as the other running board however on this side, the underlying metal has some surface rust with some rust pitting.


-Roof appears to be free from damage. I have never attempted to remove the roof but I noticed some time ago that the interior metal attachment rail had some flaking surface rust on the top of the inside channel. I vacuumed up the flaked material and it appears to have been stable since. The attachment nuts and bolts are rusty. The outer rain channel appears to have few if any issues besides paint quality. As noted in the paint section, there are a few areas of paint crazing on the roof. The interior headliner fell off the roof some time ago. I recently disposed of it as it had become brittle and unusable. The lack of the headliner allows easy inspection of the FRP roof and there appear to be no significant FRP issues, besides some possible top surface stress cracks as noted in the Paint section above.



Spare tire carrier

-There is a rear swinging carrier arm for the spare tire and for fuel cans. I have never seen a FJ40 or a photo of a FJ40 with a carrier like this one, and I assume it is an aftermarket device. It appears to have been professionally fabricated. The passenger side pivot hinge uses the factory tire carrier holes and it appears that the body-mounted part of the hinge may actually be the factory hinge for the OEM tire carrier. The latching mechanism on the other side has a backing plate that appears not to be a factory part. The latching mechanism has a clip that appears to have separated from the assembly and needs to be repaired. There is presently no secondary method to keep the carrier arm restrained if the latch were to become loose, although there appears to be plenty of room, where needed, to secondarily secure the arm with one of several obvious methods. The purchaser will need to make arrangements to safely secure the carrier arm from movement during vehicle transport.


-The carrier arm has locations for two 5 gallon gas cans. One can was present and mounted when I purchased the vehicle, but the can has almost totally rusted out at the bottom seam. In addition to not being able to hold liquid, the gas can is not structurally sound and requires repairs or replacement. The second can location was empty when I purchased the vehicle. The second can attachment hardware was also not present at the time of purchase, but appears would be fairly straightforward for a qualified individual to reproduce if not available from other sources. As with the carrier arm latch, there is no backup restraint to hold gas cans in place if the primary attachment mechanism was to come loose. There appears to be room, where needed, to secondarily secure the can(s) with one of several obvious methods. As the gas can that is present is defective, and as there is a possibility that the can, or part of it could come off of the carrier arm during vehicle transport, I have removed the gas can from the carrier. The purchaser will need to make arrangements for safe stowage of the defective can during vehicle transport.

-As discussed in the quarter panel damage note above, at some time prior to my purchase of the car, there appears to have been a relatively mild impact to the rear of the car. The impact appears to have pushed the carrier arm into the driver side restraining and latching bracket, bending the bracket and pushing in a small area of the rear driver side lower quarter panel, where the bracket attaches. It appears it would be relatively straightforward for a qualified individual to straighten the right retaining and latching bracket, should it be desired to keep the carrier on the vehicle. There is some apparent evidence of prior repair to the gas can mounting bracket on the passenger side of the carrier arm, near the area of damage on the quarter panel, however the actual carrier arm appears to not have taken a direct impact (This observation may explain why there was no second gas can present). The passenger side gas can mounting bracket was also slightly bent inwards at the time I purchased the vehicle and there may have been some repair done to the attachment at the same time of the other apparent work on the carrier arm. In preparing this inspection guide, I attempted to partially straighten out the bend to see if it would be possible to fully restore it without having to first remove the welded-on part. After a few minutes of effort with a few hand tools (primarily a vice), it is now reasonably straight and thus it would certainly appear that it could fully restored by a qualified individual without cutting it off of the arm first. The entire carrier system, including mounting hardware, the defective latching mechanism, the supporting body panels, and all attachments, should be inspected by a qualified individual, and repaired as needed by a qualified individual, to return the system to a roadworthy condition.


-If a purchaser wishes to return the FJ40 to a more original condition, note that completer used OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) tire carriers are available from FJ40 parts suppliers from about $200.



Windows/Glass

-Windshield appears to be an aftermarket replacement (labeled “Shat-R-Proof”). It appears to have some very light road pitting typical of older vehicles, some very light windshield wiper scratches and a few very light interior scratches. The rubber seal is in very poor cosmetic condition with cracks and gaps, and is not weathertight. At some time prior to my purchase of the vehicle, two screws were installed in the lower driver’s side windshield corner in an apparent attempt to repair a leak by securing the rubber seal corner into the frame. There is also a large blob of silicone rubber on the rubber seal, that appears to be from the same repair effort.


-Driver side door venting window (triangular) opens and locks closed. The ASAHI TEMPERLITE glass appears to be free from damage or issues. The rubber weatherstripping is in poor cosmetic condition.


-Driver side roll down window ASAHI TEMPERLITE glass appears to be free from damage and other issues. The fabric and rubber weatherstripping is in poor condition. The upper channel and side channel weatherstripping appear to be preventing the window from moving and tightly closing. The window roll-up mechanism moves the window, but requires some force. I have not attempted to fully open the window, for many years, due to concerns of harming the mechanism. The window is not weathertight due to the weatherstripping issues noted.


-Driver side rear quarter panel ASAHI TEMPERLITE side and curved corner glass appear to be free from damage or other significant issues. Rubber weather stripping on both windows is in poor cosmetic condition and is not weathertight due to cracks and gaps.


-Rear hatch ASAHI TEMPERLITE glass appears to be free from damage or other significant issues. Rubber weather stripping is in poor cosmetic condition and is not weathertight due to cracks and gaps.


-Passenger side rear quarter panel ASAHI TEMPERLITE side and curved corner glass appear free from damage. The Asahi marking on this corner glass is slightly different from all the other Asahi markings on the vehicle. While it appears to be the OEM glass, it may be a replacement from a later date. Rubber weather stripping on both windows is in poor cosmetic condition and is not weathertight due to cracks and gaps.


-Passenger side roll down window is ASAHI TEMPERLITE glass and appears to be in generally good shape except for a vertical scratch near the rear window frame. The scratch appears to have been caused by the window seal when opening and closing the window, as the weatherstripping is in very poor condition. Upper channel weatherstripping degradation appears to be preventing the window from tightly closing. The window roll-up/roll-down mechanism appears to work well. The window is not weathertight due to the weatherstripping issues noted.


-Passenger side door venting window (triangular) opens and locks closed. The ASAHI TEMPERLITE glass appears to be free from damage or issues. The rubber weatherstripping on both sides is oxidized.


-There are no exterior side mirrors on the vehicle, nor could I find any evidence that any external mirrors were ever installed. In researching parts for the FJ40, I have found that OEM mirror parts, listed for 1968 vehicles, are available from FJ40 parts suppliers. I do not know the 1968 FJ40 history well enough to know if side mirrors were standard, optional, or later became available. Note that new complete kits for 1968 vehicles, that use predominantly new OEM parts, are available from FJ40 parts suppliers for just over $200 (parts for both sides). Bidders should contact their State Department of Motor Vehicles, prior to bidding, to determine if the side mirrors are required in their State.



Interior


-Front Seats frames appearfree from damage. Front seat back steel covers are free from damage except for about a 1” diameter slight outward dent on the passenger seat back plate. The gray/silver paint on frames and backs is in generally poor shape. There are paint scratches along with some paint scuffing and surface rust. Seat covers may be original to the vehicle, as may be the cotton-looking padding material which can be seen where the seat frame protrudes the covers. At some time a mouse has been in the vehicle and stored some seeds in the seat padding and elsewhere, in addition to leaving some droppings. I had previously vacuumed up as much of the dirt and debris in the vehicle as possible. In order to thoroughly remove any remaining mouse debris, it appears the old padding will likely need to be replaced, before cleaned seat covers are re-installed or replaced. Both of the seat back release assemblies function and the seats easily fold forward, but both releases have some broken plastic on the knobs. The driver seat fore-aft adjustment slides work as does the slide release lever. At the time I purchased the vehicle, the driver’s seat was missing one of the front latches on the toolbox below the seat and the one latch that was present did not close tightly (the seat tilts back if these latches are open). Used toolbox latches are available from FJ40 parts suppliers. There are some spares in the toolbox, including a fan belt and plug wires, that have been there since I bought the vehicle. There is also a screwdriver and a lug wrench in the toolbox but there is no jack in the toolbox or elsewhere in the vehicle. There was also an empty “new” oil can in the toolbox which I disposed of at time of purchase. There is some residual oil, likely from the old can, still present on the surface of the toolbox and items in the toolbox. The toolbox seat latches are defective and will need to be repaired or replaced as needed, by a qualified individual, to return the driver seat to a roadworthy condition.


-There were no seat belts present when I purchased the vehicle. I assumed they did not exist because I thought the vehicle may have pre-dated federal seat-belt requirement laws. While preparing this guide, I found that OEM lap seat belts, listed for use in 1968 vehicles, are available from FJ40 parts suppliers. I subsequently re-inspected the vehicle but I could find not find any evidence that seat belts were ever previously installed. After some more research, I still do not know the FJ40 history well enough to know if the this vehicle, that appears to have been produced in April or May of 1968, was provided with seat belts when it was manufactured as a standard or optional feature, or if the OEM lap belt parts became available for the model year at a later date. Bidders should contact their State Department of Motor Vehicles, prior to bidding, to determine their State’s requirements for seat belts and to understand their State’s seatbelt usage laws. Regardless of the history of the vehicle, or regulatory requirements, bidders are strongly encouraged to consider the safety value of installing lap belts, especially as new OEM belts from FJ40 parts suppliers are only between $90 and $230 (several suppliers with wide price variance - lap belts for both driver and passenger including mounting hardware). Note that aftermarket driver and passenger lap belt sets, advertised as meeting Federal Standards, are available from FJ40 parts suppliers for as little s $35. Bidders are also strongly encouraged to carefully consider and research options for providing the driver and passenger with more contemporary 3-point (shoulder) harnesses protection.


-Rear jump seats were not present when I purchased the vehicle. I do not know Toyota history well enough to know if the 1968 FJ40 was sold without the jump seats, or if the seats were removed and disposed of by a previous owner. Note that used jump seats may be available from FJ40 parts suppliers starting at $300 a pair needing refinishing, and are often available from other sources (a 1969 set that appears to fit the 1968 FJ40 LV model was available on eBay in early august). Note also that OEM and aftermarket jump seat lap belts are available from FJ40 parts suppliers. Should a purchaser wish to buy and install rear jump seats, note that some of the front seat 3-point harness options require the OEM roll bar, and the OEM roll bar appears to require a shorter jump seat (which of course, costs more than the longer ones). Note also that used roll bars are available from FJ40 specialty parts suppose for under $300 with head rests and less without.


-A lightweight gun rack is installed in the right rear interior area. It does not look original to the car and appears to have been installed by a previous owner. I have never attempted to use it for any purpose.


-As mentioned earlier, the headliner glue failed and the headliner fell off the roof during my ownership of the vehicle. Over time, the foam and plastic of the headliner became too brittle to be usable and the headliner was discarded. Replacement OEM and aftermarket headliners are available from FJ40 parts suppliers (the OEM part is expensive at about $550)


-Dashboard cover is red and is in fairly good condition. The plastic knobs on the windshield releases appear to be in good condition. I have not ever attempted to use them to lower the windshield. There is a vent control on the dashboard (mechanical, not electrical), that appears to not move. I have not investigated the problem to determine if the cause is the pull assembly, the cable, or the actual vent mechanism.


-Dashboard appears to have all the original switches and lights. One switch is missing the black plastic knob and it appears that a previous owner screwed on a tire valve cap in it’s place. As noted in the paint section, the dash may have had a touch-up coat of white paint. There were some red “Dymo” type labels for some of the dash switches when I purchased the vehicle and they are still there. Note that dashboard label decal kits are available from several FJ40 parts suppliers.


-Dashboard cluster and surround panel is cosmetically fairly good except the is a small dent of the left side just under the left corner of the speedometer area. It appears that with a some sheetmetal finesse, the part could be restored. Note that the correct silver paint color is available from FJ40 parts suppliers. Note also that used instrument cluster parts may be available from FJ40 parts suppliers and often appear to be available on eBay.


-The steering wheel has general surface oxidation of the plastic and some more pronounced oxidation near the windshield side of the hub, all likely resulting decades in the sun. It also appears likely that there are some cracks in the plastic at the areas where the spokes meet the hub. A previous owner wrapped some electrical tape around the spokes in these areas, but I have not removed any tape to confirm cracks are present. The issue appears to be cosmetic as there is no movement evident in the area when using the steering wheel, but the steering wheel should be inspected by a qualified individual to determine if it is roadworthy. Note that used and aftermarket steering wheels are available from FJ40 parts suppliers. Note also that for high-cosmetic-quality restorations, re-manufactured steering wheels are available from FJ40 parts suppliers, but they are very expensive at about $750 for the part (hold onto those old steering wheels as the core charge is over $200).


-Glovebox lid opens and closes but the hinge is slightly bowed causing it to be difficult to fully close. It appears likely the hinge could be straightened. A prior owner appears to have installed two pieces of electrical wire to limit the travel of the lid. The 4WD instruction placard is present on the glovebox lid and is in fair condition. Note that replacement placards are available from FJ40 parts suppliers. There are some old plugs, a distributor cap, an extra door handle, a wrench and a small section of a repair manual in the glovebox.


-Front Heater has some light surface rust on the face and other sides of the unit. The paint is oxidized. The airflow direction damper moves freely. There appear to be no coolant leaks at the heater.


-The car does not have a rear heater. There are T’s in the coolant hoses going to/from the engine/radiator/front heater. The T’s are located in the cabin just behind the firewall. They have short lengths of hose that have been pugged by a prior owner with large bolts held in place with hose clamps. There also appears to be an electrical connection for this rear heater just behind and below the dashboard and there is a second heater fan control on the dashboard. My research indicates it is possible that the rear heater was only offered as an option on 1968 vehicles. Regardless, the presence of the T’s and the likely prior owner plugging of the rear heater hoses, appears to indicate this vehicle had the rear heater, but at some time it was removed and disposed of by a prior owner. Note that used and re-manufactured rear heaters are available from FJ40 parts suppliers for just over $200 including the supply and return lines, (and are often available on eBay).


-Rear view mirror glass is cracked. Note that OEM mirrors are available from FJ40 parts suppliers for under $70, used for about $30, and aftermarket for under $20.


-Driver side sun visor is in poor cosmetic shape, but is functional. Passenger side sun visor is missing. Note that replacement visors are available from FJ40 specialist part suppliers.


-Front carpeting is mostly present but is in poor condition and disintegrating. In preparing this inspection guide, I pulled up the driver side carpet to determine the extent of the driver side floor pan rust, The carpet is stored in the vehicle.


-Gas cap has surface rust. Note that replacement gas caps are available from FJ40 parts suppliers for under $15.


-Fuel tank appeared to be leak free when the tank was last full in 2005. I have kept the level low to keep the fuel fresh and there have been no leaks. There is currently less than a gallon of fuel in the tank. The fuel tank pint is in poor cosmetic condition. There are several areas where the paint has been scuffed or worn off and some light surface rust in a number of locations. The rubber filler hoses appear to be in functional condition, but appearance is only fair due to fading of the rubber and oxidation of metal clamps and fittings.



Chassis


-Many parts of the chassis appear to have been spray undercoated in black or painted with a satin black prior to my purchase of the vehicle. There are a few areas where the undercoating seemed thicker than normal, and I was concerned that there might be damage or corrosion beneath. The most obvious location was on the outside of the driver side frame rail, just rear of the floor pan rust-through. I used a chisel to remove some of the the undercoating in the area and it appears the applicator just sprayed on more material in the specific location. The frame rail in the area appears to be free of any damage or significant corrosion. A photo of the area is included in the listing.


-Frame rails and cross members all appear to be free of damage and solid. There appears to be only some light surface rust on the outside of frame components (where not undercoated). The interior surfaces of the frame rails and crossmember are generally difficult to access but in all places I could see or touch, there appears to be just road dirt and/or surface rust present. At some time in the past I pressure washed the frame and underside of the body and I was able to direct water into the frame rails from several locations. The rinsate water flowed freely. Initially there was a fair amount of dirt but it cleared quickly. The residual material appeared free of rust or other materials of concern. My research indicated that the FJ40 rear chassis crossmember channel and the two rear triangulation braces often have significant corrosion issues. This FJ40 appears to not have this issue at all. These parts appear similar to all other frame members with only some only light surface rust. There is a photo of this area in the listing.


-Frame body mount brackets, outriggers and extensions all appear to be free of damage and significant corrosion except for the “running board stay” extension that supports the driver side running board. As stated in the Body section above, the running board stay extension appears to have hit something like a large rock and has been bent and twisted. The outrigger which supports the stay, is riveted to the frame and appears undamaged. It appears possible to straighten the running board stay, however as used stays are available from FJ40 parts suppliers for less than $50, replacement may make more sense. There is a photo of the bent stay in the listing.


-The vehicle does not any front or rear tow hooks (the type that mount on top of the frame rails or on the back of the rear chassis member). The chassis appears to have the bolt holes that the tow hooks use, but I do not know the 1968 FJ40 history well enough to know if tow hooks were available as Toyota option or standard part on the 1968 FJ40. Note that aftermarket tow hooks are available from FJ40 parts suppliers for under $30 for a pair.


-Front bumper appears to to be an aftermarket bumper. It is constructed of heavy gauge steel “L” material (approximately 1/4” thick). It has two tow bar attachments welded to it. The passenger side lower end of the bumper has a slight warp or twist which was present at the time I purchased the vehicle. The bumper is attached to the frame using what appear to be the original OEM bumper attachment parts. These brackets appear undamaged and free of any significant corrosion. I measured/checked the overall front end of the chassis and it all appears to be damage-free and straight/square. The bumper may have had a coat of black paint applied just before I purchased the vehicle. The front bumper has two drilled and tapped holes for mounting a license plate. Current condition is oxidized with some surface rust spots. The OEM license plate bracket was not present when I purchased the vehicle. If a purchaser wishes to return the FJ40 to a more original condition, note that new OEM front bumpers are available from FJ40 parts suppliers for under $230 and new and used OEM license plate brackets are often available on eBay for under $100.


-A tow bar (to be able to tow the FJ40) was in the cargo area of the vehicle when I purchased it. It appears to fit the attachments on the front bumper but I have never attempted to use the tow bar and I do not recall ever removing it from the cargo area of the vehicle. The tow bar and bumper attachment points both appear to have been used prior to my purchase of the vehicle. There is wiring at the front bumper for connecting the FJ40 tail lights to a tow vehicle, but I have never attempted to use the connection. I am not qualified to provide any guidance regarding the suitability of using any of this equipment to safely tow the vehicle, or for any other use. An inspection of the tow bar equipment and attachment to should be performed by a qualified individual, before any use of the device, to assure it is roadworthy.


-Rear bumperettes appear to be free of damage. The outer face of the rear frame crossmember forms the support for the bumperettes. As mentioned earlier, it appears to be solid and undamaged. The bumperettes and rear chassis member may have had a coat of black paint applied just before I purchased the vehicle. Current condition is oxidized with some minor surface rust spots. The license plate light appears to be the OEM part and is mounted between the bumperettes on the bottom edge of the body tub. I do not know the FJ40 history well enough to know if this was ever a factory location for the light, or if a prior owner moved it as part of the tire carrier installation process. The light housing is a brown color and the lens is missing. Rubber gasket and paint are oxidized. Both rear reflectors are in good condition, however the silver metal surrounds have oxidized paint and light surface rust. Note that the new OEM lens part number appears to have been discontinued by Toyota, but the entire OEM light housing (with the lens) is still available from FJ40 parts suppliers for under $25. There is no license plate mounting bracket below the light. If there was a bracket immediately below the light, the license plate would be partially blocked by the current location of the spare tire. A lower mounting position below the spare tire appears possible, but is presently blocked by the rear tow hitch.


-There is a rear tow hitch present. It appears like it may have been custom fabricated for a farm use based on the appearance and as there is no ball or apparent way to easily attach a ball. I am not qualified to provide any guidance regarding the suitability of using any of this equipment, for any towing or other purpose. Purchaser should arrange an inspection of the tow hitch equipment, by a qualified individual, prior to any use of the equipment.


-There is no rear step on the rear chassis crossmember. I do not know FJ40 history well enough to know if the step was an option or a standard feature on 1968 FJ40’s. It appears that the current rear hitch would not allow the step to be installed. The current location of the spare tire might also conflict with the step location. Used steps are available from FJ40 parts suppliers and new aftermarket parts are are often available on eBay.


-Splash shields and the transfer case skid plate are all present. The skid plate is in generally good condition but there appears to be a relatively small dent (2” diameter max) on the front passenger side of the plate and possibly a slight warp of about 1/8” on the passenger side flange of the skid plate. The frame rails in the area appear undamaged however, I not measured or otherwise confirmed the observation.



Suspension


-Relative to suspension components, the entire underside of the vehicle appears to be un-modified.


-The front springs and shackles appear to be undamaged and have light surface rust where not undercoated. They appear to be free of visible cracks or other issues. Suspension rubber bumpers appear to be in fair condition with only some surface rust and no significant rubber issues. The rubber is slightly separated from the steel backing plate on the outboard edge, on both front bumpers, but overall the rubber appears well attached to the steel backing plate. New and used suspension bumpers are generally available from FJ40 parts suppliers for less than $20.


-The rear springs appear to be undamaged and have light surface rust where not undercoated. They appear to be free of cracks or other issues. The shackles and bushings appear to be in fairly good condition. Rear suspension rubber leaf bumpers appear to be in good shape with only some surface rust and no significant rubber issues. They are surprisingly pliable at their likely age of 48 years. As is apparently fairly common, the rear of the vehicle tilts slightly (to the driver side). A speciality FJ40 part supplier offers a $20 “Leveler Block” that claims to solve this issue when used on new springs.


-The shocks may be OEM parts however as they appear to have been partially coated with the same black material as elsewhere on the frame, I did not attempt to look for manufacturer markings. The rubber bushings on the shocks appear to be worn with some “squeeze- out”. When I last drove the vehicle in 2005 at typical road speeds, the shocks appeared to be functional, but the current condition is unknown. Note that OEM shock bushings appear to be available from FJ40 parts suppliers for less than $5 each and front OEM shocks are available for less than $50 each. Rear OEM shocks are hard to find as apparently Toyota has discontinued the part, but there are many aftermarket shocks available from FJ40 parts suppliers and other sources.


-In general, the front suspension and steering rubber boots appear worn and in need of replacement. There appears to be some boot locations with significant quantities of caked grease on the surface, such as tie rod ends, relay rod ends, etc.


-All active suspension components such the tie rod, drag link rod, relay rod, steering arms, steering stabilizer, etc. appear to be un-damaged. Most of these components were partially spray undercoated or painted prior to my purchase of the vehicle. The appearance of this coating is generally very poor to occasionally good.


-When last driven in 2005 at typical non-highway speeds (30 to 50 MPH), the steering system appeared to have no significant alignment problems and appeared to be otherwise functional, albeit with more steering wheel play than I am used to. As I have no other FJ40 steering experience, I cannot offer any specific guidance as to the condition of the steering system. The steering and entire suspension system should be inspected by a qualified individual, and should be repaired as needed by a qualified individual, to assure they are reliable and roadworthy.





Engine, cooling, fuel and exhaust systems


-The engine starts up easily (Pull out the choke, give the gas a push, crank it and in only a few turns of the starter, the 48 year old vehicle is running). The engine runs fairly smoothly and quietly with no apparent unusual or concerning noises.


-The engine and most associated components have numerous cosmetic issues with oxidized paint, light surface rust, grime and other appearance issues..


-The engine appears to have no significant oil leaks and I have never observed any engine oil on the pavement. There is moist caked dirt (gunk) on the front of the oil pan and other locations such as near the valve cover and below engine side covers (the moisture likely oil). As I have never observed oil drips, the “gunk” may be the result of slight oil weeping over many years at the oil pan gasket, valve cover gasket, front oil seal or other similar gaskets. I have not attempted to intentionally remove any of the gunk or thoroughly clean the engine, to attempt to locate the source(s) of any oil seepage (I have removed some gunk trying to find engine identifying numbers).


-The bottom of the oil pan (skid plate) appears to be free of any damage.


-While inspecting the vehicle to write this guide, I have found that the engine has no oil filter! The vehicle has the oil pressure regulator, but a previous owner appears to have removed the original canister-type oil filter housing and appears to have bypassed the filter by brazing or similarly connecting the the oil filter supply tube to the clean oil return tube! The bracket for the canister-type oil filter is present on the manifold. After some quick research, I have found that used filter housings are available from several FJ40 parts suppliers for well under $90, along with tubing and connectors. As a possible alternative to the the used OEM filter housing and oil lines, a complete kit that allows the use of a contemporary spin-on type filter is available from at least one FJ specialty parts supplier. While it is expensive at just under $260, the supplier points out several advantages over the aging original system. Bidders are advised that the purchaser will incur parts and labor costs to restore the necessary oil filtration capability. As described in the “history” section of the guide, I have only driven the vehicle an estimated maximum of 396 miles since I bought the vehicle in 2005. I have not changed the oil on the vehicle during the time I have owned it. I recently checked the oil and it appears somewhat sooty, but is still relatively transparent. I have not disassembled any part of the engine to check for unusual or excessive wear. Under a best case scenario, the oil filter bypass would have occurred immediately prior to my purchase of the vehicle, and as such, the engine would have seen l