1929 Lincoln Victoria Coupe Model 156 by LeBaron - 1 of 4 Known! Spectacular!

Price: US $95,000.00 Item location: Mansfield, OH, United States
  • Condition: Used
  • Make: Lincoln
  • Model: Other
  • Type: Coupe
  • Trim: Victoria Coupe
  • Year: 1929
  • Mileage: 80,000
  • Engine size: 8 Cylinder
  • Number of cylinders: 8
  • Transmission: Manual
  • Drive type: Manual
  • Vehicle Title: Clear
  • Want to buy? Contact seller!
Description:

1929 Lincoln Other

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1929 Lincoln Victoria Coupe Model 156 by LeBaron Offered as a buy-it-now. Make us an offer!

This very rare Victoria Coupe is one of 3 known survivors, and arguable the finest of the them. The car was treated to a no expense spared restoration a few years back, and remains in top show condition. The interior appointments are beautifully rendered with a stunning engine turned dash, lovely hardwood trim, and the finest wool upholstery. The exterior brightwork finishes are mirror like and without a spect of pitting or corrosion, and the attention to detail and jewelry like presentation continues into the engine compartment where all finishes are correctly restored to exacting specifications. The stunning and subtle color combination of this car perfectly accentuate the lines of this coachbuilt beauty.
This is a beautiful car!



We have many more photographs of this car, please click on any image to be taken to our full-size image list!
Lincoln is an American luxury car manufacturer, operated under the Ford Motor Company. Founded in 1917 by Henry M. Leland and acquired by Ford in 1922, Lincoln has been manufacturing vehicles intended for the upscale markets since the 1920s. Leland named the brand after his longtime hero Abraham Lincoln, for whom he had voted in the first presidential elections for which he was eligible.
Henry M. Leland was one of the founders of Cadillac (originally the Henry Ford Company). He left the Cadillac division of General Motors during World War I and formed the Lincoln Motor Company to build Liberty aircraft engines with his son Wilfred. After the war, the company's factories were retooled to manufacture luxury automobiles. The company encountered severe financial troubles during the transition, coupled with body styling that wasn't comparable to other luxury makers, and after having produced only 150 cars in 1922, was forced into bankruptcy and sold for USD $8,000,000 to the Ford Motor Company on February 4 1922, which went to pay off some of the creditors. The purchase of Lincoln was a personal triumph for Henry Ford, who had been forced out of his second (after Detroit Automobile Company) company by a group of investors led by Leland. Ford's company, renamed Cadillac in 1902 and purchased by rival General Motors in 1909, was Lincoln's chief competitor. Lincoln quickly became one of America's top selling luxury brands alongside Cadillac and Packard. Ford made no immediate change, either in the chassis or the V-8 L-head engine which was rated 36.4 SAE and produced 90 bhp at 2,800 rpm. An unusual feature of this power unit was the 60 degree separation of the cylinder blocks that helped to cut down on synchronous vibration found with similar engines with 90 degree separation produced at the time. After the Ford takeover, bodywork changes and reduced prices increased sales to 5,512 vehicles from March to December of 1922. In 1923, several body styles were introduced, that included two- and three-window, four door sedans and a phaeton that accommodated four passengers. They also offered a two passenger roadster and a seven passenger touring sedan and limousine, which was sold for $5,200. A sedan, limo, cabriolet and town car were also offered by coachbuilders Fleetwood, and a second cabriolet was offered by coachbuilder Brunn. Prices for the vehicles built by these coachbuilders went for as much as $7,200, and despite the limited market appeal, Lincoln sales rose about 45 percent to produce 7,875 cars and the company was operating at a profit by the end of 1923.
1924 saw the introduction of large touring sedans used by police departments around the country. They were known as Police Flyers, which were equipped with four wheel brakes, two years before they were introduced on private sale vehicles. These specially equipped vehicles, with bullet proof windshields measuring 7/8 of an inch thick and spot lights mounted on the ends of the windshield, also came with an automatic windshield wiper for the driver and a hand operated wiper for the front passenger. Police whistles were coupled to the exhaust system and gun racks were also fitted to these vehicles.
Optional equipment wasn't necessarily an issue with Lincolns, however, customers who wanted special items were accommodated. Lincoln chose not to make yearly model changes, used as a marketing tool of the time, designed to lure new customers. Lincoln customers of the time were known to purchase more than one Lincoln with different bodywork, so changing the vehicle yearly was not done to accommodate their customer base. In 1927, Lincoln adopted the greyhound as their emblem. The Lincoln division was turned over to Edsel Ford by Henry Ford who grew weary of his son’s new ideas and was generally reluctant to change. Lincolns grew ever more opulent with the finest materials used in their construction. Separate books were not kept for the division and it is rumored that despite the fact that the Lincoln cost more than its Packard contemporary, the company lost money on every one sold. Lincolns were second to none in any category during the classic era. Our Ebay Policies:
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