1936 Buick Century 60 Black

Price: US $19,500.00 Item location: Andrews, Texas, United States
  • Condition: Used
  • Make: Buick
  • Model: Century
  • Year: 1936
  • Mileage: 20,000
  • Vehicle Title: Clear
  • Want to buy? Contact seller!

1936 Buick Century

1936 Buick Century 60 Black
$19,500 OBO/or best cash offer in person
*This is an original car with new custom-made wood door panels ready to install. The doors and front seat were removed for purpose of rebuild. They are complete!
*4-door, uicide doors.
*Car runs.
*More information about this model below.
*Car is beautiful when cleaned up.
*The mileage is an estimate, ctual mileage can be provided upon request (I'm listing this for my dad and do not have this information in hand.)
The first Buick to reach 100 MPH was the appropriately named Century, n 1936. It shared a new 320.2 cubic-inch straight eight with the Roadmaster (Series 80) and the Limited (Series 90). It rode on a fairly short wheelbase, easuring just 118 inches, nd featured rearward sweeping lines with a rounded grille in the front.
In 1930 Buick introduced their Series 60 which served as a replacement for the Series 129. There were seven body styles to select from, ll sitting atop a 132-inch wheelbase. The four-door phaeton with seating for seven cost the least, elling for nearly $1,600. Only 807 examples of this body style was produced in 1930. The Most expensive body style was the Limousine, lso with seating for seven, nd demanded a price of nearly $2,100. This body style was the most exclusive, ith only 690 examples produced. The most popular setup in this series was the four-door Special Sedan which had seating for five and sold for $1,760. A total of 12,508 examples were produced.
The most popular Century bodystyle was the 4-door sedan which saw 17,806 examples produced. Just 717 examples of the convertible coupe were built, elling for $1,135. Other body styles included both a 2-door sport coupe and a 2-door Victoria coupe.
In 1936, he Buick Century appeared in the Series 60 lineup. The name 'Century' was used to imply a top speed of 100 mph; during the 1930s the 'Century Mark' was used as a way of distinguishing 100 mph cars. The 100 mph top speed in the Series 60 was due to a new 320 cubic-inch straight eight engine that produced 120 horsepower and 238 foot-pounds of torque.
Styling changed in 1936 with the Series 60 now featuring the new Art deco look. They featured founded grilles, ertical bars, nd rearward sweeping lines. The wheelbase measured 122-inches and there were five body styles to select from. Sales were very strong, ith over 17,800 examples of the four-door sedan being produced. The next most popular model in the Series 60 range was the two-door Victoria Coupe which saw production reach 3,762 units. The base price for a Series 60 was just under $1,100; the most expensive was not that much more, elling for $1,135. All of the Series 60 were equipped with a sliding gear three-speed transmission with floor shift controls. Hydraulic brakes could on found on all four corners.